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Don Philip Faithful's Blog (128)

Technical Deconstruction

The term “technical analysis” usually refers to the study of stock prices.  A technical analyst might use real-time or closing prices of stocks to predict future prices.  This is an interesting concept because of what is normally excluded from the analysis - namely, everything except prices.  Given that the approach doesn’t necessarily consider the health or profitability of the underlying companies, a purely technical approach seems to offer guidance that is disconnected from reality.  Yet…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on March 17, 2018 at 3:00am — No Comments

Little Hitler Syndrome

What most people call “analysis,” I refer to this as “guidance.”  It is not guidance in terms of guiding the company; but rather, I provide a narrative to help guide people through the data - of which there is a great deal.  I play the role of a tour guide.  I remember when I was a teaching assistant for a social science class - and there was a contentious area that would likely be the focal point for essays - I said that it didn’t matter to me what “opinions” people expressed.  Nobody had…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on March 3, 2018 at 11:00am — 1 Comment

When Aggregates Fail

In general, any expression of performance that applies to a department can, if the data system is configured properly, be stated in relation to individual workers.  For instance, if # of sales contracts / # of customer enquiries = success rate, the success rate can be given for the entire dealership and also for each sales agent in that dealership.  Due to the differences in performance between agents, it can be problematic to only make use of the aggregate.  Some agents might be blamed for…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on February 25, 2018 at 7:30am — No Comments

Applied Ontology and the Drivers of Data Recognition

I shared my story in a few blogs about returning to university to do a graduate degree.  In my first class, I found myself being asked to define “ontology.”  It was a course on the Geography of Disability.  I returned to class the following week with some details.  I said that strangely enough, this is not a word that can be found in all of my dictionaries.  One dictionary listed “oncology,” which I believe is the study of cancerous tumours.  My Collins Cobuild dictionary says, “Ontology is…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on February 11, 2018 at 7:30am — No Comments

The Theory of Theory

Since I am sometimes asked to explain phenomena in the absence of data, it becomes necessary to determine what data is required to explain phenomena.  Some would say the best approach is to develop and test a hypothesis - to start filling a void of space with pinholes of light - until there are enough lit pinholes to provide a…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on January 20, 2018 at 6:00am — No Comments

Infereferencing Algorithm

I once posted about making use of narrative objects.  In this blog, I will be discussing an algorithm that supports the creation of these objects.  I call it my “Infereferencing Algorithm”: this term is most easily pronounced with a slight pause between “infer” and “referencing.”  I consider this a useful and widely applicable algorithm although I don’t believe it operates well in a relational database environment.  Instead, I use “mass data files”:  these contain unstructured lumps of…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on December 31, 2017 at 8:00am — No Comments

Character Analysis in Production and Sales

A fictitious retailer which I am calling Malwart sells automobiles and automotive parts.  On this blog I will be focused on the sale of a particular automobile model called the Blair - a sporty compact that can be ordered in custom colour schemes.  Because all sales must be done by clients that also have accounts,…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on December 24, 2017 at 6:30am — No Comments

Judging Health Through Metrics of Conformance

I have written in the past about the difference between market demand and operational capacity - and how difficult it is to determine what exactly is being measured in relation to either.  Has the demand for a product declined, or is the organization simply less capable of satisfying it?  For example, the fact there are no bananas in the grocery store does not mean that there is no demand for bananas; but the absence of revenues from the sale of bananas might be regarded, rather erroneously,…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on December 9, 2017 at 10:30am — No Comments

Astrology, Homicide Cases, and Everything Else

The “three wise men” in the story of the nativity are believed to be Magi or Zoroastrians.  As the story goes, these three wise men followed the Star of Bethlehem in search for the messiah.  For the most part, the Zoroastrians supported the one-god concept - and they also believed in a messiah.  It made sense for them - sometimes regarded as the original astrologers - to use their special talents to seek out the baby Jesus.  It makes sense purely from a narrative standpoint; although to me…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on November 26, 2017 at 8:00am — 3 Comments

Social Metrics from Parallel Narrative Objects

At times it might be desirable to determine what storylines on a narrative database contain certain key elements.  In the example below, the object “Alien Allan” is used to compile a listing of titles on the database that are in thematic agreement.  But rather than simply provide the listing of titles, the algorithm tabulates the key elements contained in these titles.  Notice that the most important elements resulting from the search do not necessarily match the elements in the submitted…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on November 11, 2017 at 5:30am — No Comments

Quantitative Alienation in the Workplace

For my graduate paper, I studied perceptions of workplace stress through the critical lens of social disablement.  Writing this paper was certainly an intellectual exercise that at the time didn’t seem to have many practical applications.  I am therefore honoured to become better acquainted with the “mechanics” of quantitative alienation through my day-to-day duties.  I respect the fact that I can’t share any substantial details about my actual work processes on a blog.  It will therefore be…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on November 4, 2017 at 8:30am — 1 Comment

Searching and Smelling by Objects to Find Profiles and Settings

A person will ordinarily search the contents of a database using matching keywords and tags.  Sophisticated databases might allow for filtering:  for example using NOT, AND, OR on a number of keyword strings such as both titles and product descriptions.  It is not normally possible to submit, say, a personality profile to a database - or a personality profile and a setting.  Searching for “serial murders subway terminals” might lead to event information about precisely this, apparent serial…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on October 27, 2017 at 10:00am — No Comments

Object Constructs More Accurate than Language or Numbers

In my last blog, I explained my “Animal Spirit Model,” which I used to consider Paddock the Vegas shooter and the fictitious character Jack Torrance (played by Jack Nicholson) in the 1980 horror movie “The Shining.”  In this blog, I will be considering the character of Mrs. Torrance - Jack’s wife (played by Shelley Duvall).  Below I present the computer generated description for Mrs. Torrance followed by her animal spirit on Excel.  The descriptor program responds to the settings on the…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on October 13, 2017 at 5:00am — No Comments

Engaging the Animal Spirit in the Narrative

How might a person go about studying something elusive like serial murder or terrorism?  I have no formal exposure in this area.  Much of the technology that I mention in this blog is meant for another purpose.  That other purpose is to study characters in movies, which for me is a great diversion.  In particular, I like to map out where certain characters might be found (or lost - i.e. missing characters): the settings they occupy, their roles, their relationships.  It goes without saying…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on October 9, 2017 at 5:00am — No Comments

Suspense Analog - Data Object

I periodically use the term “data object” in my blogs.  Since I do not normally blog about data objects per se, I find myself simply stating that in-depth analysis might need to go beyond numbers; therefore, we should consider data objects.  This might confuse readers unaware of what a data object is - or at least what I mean by it.  To make matters challenging, readers inclined towards data science do not necessarily have much background in the liberal arts; and those with degrees in the…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on September 22, 2017 at 1:00am — No Comments

Sequenced Differential Lattices and Randomness

The images on this blog are from an algorithmic environment that I first developed about 15 years ago - rendered using a graphical system that I wrote in Java.  A “differential lattice” is a structured array of differences between two points:  e.g. the difference between the closing price of a stock on day T-0 (today) and T-6 (a week ago).  Consequently, if the closing prices are $10.10, $10.20, $10.30, $10.40, and $10.50 (today), then 0/3 is from T-0/T-3 or $10.50 less $10.20 = $0.30.  A…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on August 12, 2017 at 5:30am — No Comments

Operational Data and Social Justice

I spotted an interesting book in my local library recently:  The Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada [1].  I thought to myself, our government spent considerable resources on this commission.  I should at least browse through the final report.  I flipped through the first few pages.  I found a note saying that the contents are public domain.  In this blog, I reproduce some of the contents of the report to create a setting for my discussion on operational data. …

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on August 6, 2017 at 5:00am — No Comments

Science of the Body - Different Kind of Risk Reward Analysis

I was wondering how to approach this blog when I decided to toast some raisin-bread for breakfast.  Shortly after I started eating it, I began coughing.  I have shared this “type” of story with a few people.  I often continue eating something regardless of my exact circumstances - that is to say, oblivious to the consequences.  As I ate more of the raisin-bread and my coughing worsened, I eventually reached for my inhaler.  (I have been diagnosed with borderline asthma now by two doctors.) …

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on May 13, 2017 at 8:00am — No Comments

Using Selection to Find Superman - More on Demand and Capacity

During my childhood, our school librarian said that I was invited to attend a conference of writers.  I felt honoured and privileged.  I asked what the writers intended to ask me.  She smiled and said that actually I would be asking the writers questions.  Not quite sure why I would ask these people anything and why their thoughts would matter, I nodded anyways and at some point attended the most boring event imaginable for a young child.  I thought I had died, I really did.  I sat there…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on May 7, 2017 at 6:00am — No Comments

Spectral Attenuation Monitor

About a month ago in a blog, I introduced what I described as a “spectral attenuation monitor.”…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on April 9, 2017 at 6:30am — No Comments

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