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All Blog Posts Tagged 'scientific' (9)

Spectral Attenuation Monitor

About a month ago in a blog, I introduced what I described as a “spectral attenuation monitor.”  At the time I only had an image from MS Works that…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on April 9, 2017 at 6:30am — No Comments

The Weak Karate of Six Sigma

Six Sigma is a quantitative approach to problem solving - to solve certain types of problems. At the root of Six Sigma is an improvement methodology that can be described by the acronym DMAIC: define, measure, analyze, improve, and control [1]. Those interested in reading up on Six Sigma might consider the book for dummies, which I found fairly succinct. Those wondering what I mean by "certain types of problems" should consider how to apply the approach to their own business circumstances. I…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on February 5, 2017 at 7:40am — 4 Comments

Theory Development Using Symbols Rather than Quantities

In this blog, I will be considering theory developments from changes in methodology. But first I want to express an opinion on the significance of using numbers. A "number" represents an amplitude or magnitude: 5 pencils; 13 paperclips; 50 sheets of paper. The purpose of these numbers is to facilitate the counting of things that are presumably the same in a specific way: e.g. all 5 pencils are in fact pencils - for if 1 were an eraser, there would be 4 pencils and 1 eraser. The use of…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on August 20, 2016 at 8:30am — No Comments

Deconstructing Symbolic Expression

I sometimes ask myself while musing over the need for a particular service, "I wonder if this is commercially viable?" If the service is routine and the required software is rather inexpensive, perhaps there is little need for a company to outsource. I cannot think of any company that would routinely outsource work normally performed on a spreadsheet. I suspect that decades ago some companies hired specialists to handle spreadsheets; this seems much less likely today in light of the…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on July 2, 2016 at 7:07am — No Comments

The Perfect Cheer

I recall the first time I encountered the idea of "asset allocation" many years ago. As the argument goes, the perfect allocation of assets should lead to the greatest return possible in light of one's risk tolerance. Perhaps thousands of years ago, although I haven't studied this in any detail, somebody had the idea that dancing in just the right way might satisfy the spirits enough to cause it to rain. There is the similar notion of delivering the perfect incantation to invoke supernatural…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on September 13, 2015 at 6:06am — No Comments

Seasonality

I have never been formally trained on how to deal with seasonality. But I wanted to take a moment to share my perspective based on experience, which I hope readers will find fairly straightforward. Some people use sales revenues in order to evaluate seasonal differences. I find it more desirable to analyze units sold if possible. A price increase resulting in slightly higher revenues does not in itself represent increased demand. Nor should discounted prices leading to reduced revenues…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on August 23, 2015 at 5:19am — No Comments

Fallacy of Rational Prerequisite & My Fruitless Existence

Before elaborating on my fruitless existence - about my decision to avoid fruit - I want to emphasize how this blog is actually about something that I call the "Fallacy of Rational Prerequisite." There will be some misunderstanding about this term even after my prolonged explanation. I just want to state plainly at the outset that I am not proposing that people become irrational. If they are already so, I am not suggesting that they further the situation.…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on December 20, 2014 at 8:21am — No Comments

Causality, Closet Nazis, and the Metrics of Criteria

A few semesters into my undergraduate studies, I decided to move away from campus in order to escape the incessant party atmosphere. I chose to rent an old but roomy apartment in Kitchener, Ontario. I read somewhere that this city was formerly called New Munich. One day in the dead of morning, I heard loud banging and smashing downstairs. It seemed that neither I nor my cat could sleep, so I went to investigate. I saw the owner of the building at the front entrance of the apartment holding a…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on June 21, 2014 at 6:27am — No Comments

Building a house and building a data-analytic model

If I want to build a house, wouldn't it be wise to learn carpentry? Does the analogy hold for data-analytic multivariate models? Or is it simply enough to let a machine do it, with no knowledge by the machine operator of how to interpret the results from those modeling efforts? Or is it true, as one person has recently asserted, that he could replicate ALL statistical procedures and techniques using MapReduce, without knowing anything about statistics and probability, or the vast collection…

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Added by Bill Luker Jr on April 28, 2014 at 6:51am — 2 Comments

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