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All Blog Posts Tagged 'ontology' (19)

Six Core Aspects of Semantic AI

  1. Hybrid approach: Semantic AI is the combination of methods derived from symbolic AI and statistical AI. Virtuously playing the AI piano means that for a given use case various stakeholders, not only data scientists, but also process owners or subject matter experts, choose from available methods and tools, and collaboratively develop workflows that are most likely a good fit to tackle the underlying problem. For example, one can combine entity extraction based on…
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Added by Andreas Blumauer on May 14, 2018 at 4:30am — 2 Comments

Applied Ontology and the Drivers of Data Recognition

I shared my story in a few blogs about returning to university to do a graduate degree.  In my first class, I found myself being asked to define “ontology.”  It was a course on the Geography of Disability.  I returned to class the following week with some details.  I said that strangely enough, this is not a word that can be found in all of my dictionaries.  One dictionary listed “oncology,” which I believe is the study of cancerous tumours.  My Collins Cobuild dictionary says, “Ontology is…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on February 11, 2018 at 7:30am — No Comments

Social Metrics from Parallel Narrative Objects

At times it might be desirable to determine what storylines on a narrative database contain certain key elements.  In the example below, the object “Alien Allan” is used to compile a listing of titles on the database that are in thematic agreement.  But rather than simply provide the listing of titles, the algorithm tabulates the key elements contained in these titles.  Notice that the most important elements resulting from the search do not necessarily match the elements in the submitted…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on November 11, 2017 at 5:30am — No Comments

A Standard to build Knowledge Graphs: 12 Facts about SKOS

These days, many organisations have begun to develop their own knowledge graphs. One reason might be to build a solid basis for various machine learning and cognitive computing efforts. For many of those, it remains still unclear where to start. SKOS offers a simple way to start and opens many doors to extend a knowledge graph over time.…

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Added by Andreas Blumauer on August 28, 2017 at 3:00am — No Comments

Embedding Narrative Sense into Web Documents

I was joking when I entered on Google, “Where was my coworker yesterday?”  After reviewing the responses that appeared from the search engine, I continued, “What did she eat for breakfast?”  Sometimes the responses to my everyday questions seem insightful - on a certain level, interesting and intriguing.  Usually the quality of the responses is quite poor.  I assume therefore that the algorithms operating in the background don’t “understand” the sense of what I am asking.  If I were to ask,…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on April 1, 2017 at 9:30am — No Comments

Being an Ontologist

I am sometimes asked whether I am working on the stats, whether I am making progress on the stats, and what I do with all of the stats.  People are also prone to hyperbole.  I am told that I sure work on a lot of stats, I am always keeping myself busy doing stats, and I am the person to go to for stats.  I suppose my real job is more mysterious than the one others imagine that I do.  I first want to explain that for everyday people, the term “stats” or “statistics” often means historical…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on March 11, 2017 at 10:00am — No Comments

Dealing with Unstructured Input

It isn’t too unusual for surveys to contain open-ended questions:  respondents would be free to enter their comments in any manner.  More on an operational basis, not surveys but rather client systems might hold such comments; and not the respondents themselves but customer service agents would be responsible for entering the information.  These same agents would likely classify the nature of the exchange or comments maybe using drop-down menu choices, radials, and check-boxes.  One approach…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on February 25, 2017 at 10:47am — No Comments

Objectification of Incidents

Probably like most people, I tend to recognize data as a stream of values. Notice that I use the term values rather than numbers although in practice I guess that values are usually numerical. A data-logger gathering one type of data would result in data all of a particular type. Perhaps the concept of “big data” surrounds this preconception of data of type except that there are much larger amounts. Consider an element of value in symbolic terms, which I present below: there is an index such…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on December 10, 2016 at 9:30am — No Comments

Introducing a Graph-based Semantic Layer in Enterprises

Things, not Strings

Entity-centric views on enterprise information and all kinds of data sources provide means to get a more meaningful picture about all sorts of business objects. This method of information processing is as relevant to customers, citizens, or patients as it is to knowledge workers like lawyers, doctors, or researchers. People actually do not search for documents, but rather for facts and other chunks of information to bundle them up to provide answers to…

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Added by Andreas Blumauer on September 1, 2016 at 12:00am — No Comments

Measuring and Treating the Toxic Environment

Even today there seems to be considerable debate over the exact meaning of "stress." During my graduate studies, I pointed out that there are similar themes in the literature pertaining to stress; that perhaps researchers have been overemphasizing the differences. Among the most persistent themes is the distinction between stress and stressors. Hans Selye asserted in 1936 is that stress is an internal response against any form of noxious stimulant. He described the environmental factors…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on July 30, 2016 at 7:30am — No Comments

Ableism in the Numbers - Social Metrification

Ableism (able + ism) is apparent in many interactions between people. While driving on a road having a posted limit of 60 KPH, I was traveling slower since I expected a red light to soon appear ahead of me. The driver behind me - at that point stopped due to the red light - hollered that no car should be driving less than the posted limit. I explained, "60 is the maximum speed. You shouldn't do more than the…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on July 16, 2016 at 6:27am — No Comments

Deconstructing Symbolic Expression

I sometimes ask myself while musing over the need for a particular service, "I wonder if this is commercially viable?" If the service is routine and the required software is rather inexpensive, perhaps there is little need for a company to outsource. I cannot think of any company that would routinely outsource work normally performed on a spreadsheet. I suspect that decades ago some companies hired specialists to handle spreadsheets; this seems much less likely today in light of the…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on July 2, 2016 at 7:07am — No Comments

Following the Odour of Data - Catching Scent

In recent blogs, I wrote about using codified narrative as a form of data. I also discussed using attribution models to systematically evaluate codified narrative for ontological constructs: e.g. "child abuse" "physical confinement" "cannibalism." I provide a brief overview of these topics a bit later in the blog. The third important piece to make use of narrative data involves "attribution profiling" in a process that I call "catching scent." Following the odour of data involves…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on April 29, 2016 at 4:44am — 1 Comment

Countering Quantitative Alienation with Geographic Codified Narrative

Codified narrative is the product of converting human-friendly narrative into computer-friendly code. In past blogs, I discussed my own approach towards this process of codification. Here, I will be covering the idea of spatial, temporal, and contextual distribution of codified narrative. I have never suggested that narrative can or should be used in place of quantitative data. However, I have reflected on how the quantitative regime has tended to dominate discourse; this has perhaps led to…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on April 2, 2016 at 8:15am — 2 Comments

Overcoming Aspects of Social Disablement in Data

When the performance of an employee is evaluated, ideally there are no externalities to complicate the analysis. If the employee has a computer that is constantly freezing up - or the servers in the company frequently operate slowly - the employee's performance data will reflect the functionality and effectiveness of these systems. If the company occupies a highly competitive market, declining sales data is attributable at least in part to competition rather than the behaviours of employees.…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on July 25, 2015 at 5:44am — No Comments

Ontology for Data Science

When I returned to university to do a graduate degree, I was interested to discover how certain terms are subject to "intellectual interpretation." A word that I was asked to explain during one of my earliest classes was "ontology." Since this term was absent from my dictionary, I originally confused it with "oncology." I faintly recall that oncology involves the study of tumors. After consulting a few sources, I said that ontology is the study of how things come to exist or into being. I…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on May 30, 2015 at 6:17am — No Comments

Linked Data meets Data Science

As a long-term member of the Linked Data community, which has evolved from W3C's Semantic Web, the latest developments around Data Science have become more and more attractive to me due to its complementary perspectives on similar challenges. Both disciplines work on questions like these:

  • How to extract meaningful information from large amounts of data?
  • How to connect pieces of information to other pieces in…
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Added by Andreas Blumauer on October 28, 2014 at 12:27am — No Comments

Data Instrumentalism

Being the son of a mechanic, I have spent many years handling power tools. I'm especially fond of a couple of hammer-drills in my possession. They can effortlessly drill holes through concrete. At least, this is what my father once claimed. He handed down his most treasured tools to me. I'm big on pliers and screwdrivers. This might be due to my vocational training as a technician. Even today - long after I completed my diploma and continued to further my education - I still carry a licence…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on September 27, 2014 at 7:39am — No Comments

Reductive Versus Expansive Data

I have so far encountered two general types of data . . .

Reductive Data

This is data that conforms to prescribed criteria.  I sometimes describe it has the metrics of criteria or measurements of conformity.  For instance, an organization might want to measure something potentially obscure like "efficiency."  It therefore becomes necessary to establish under what conditions or criteria something is efficient.  I describe…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on October 24, 2013 at 1:05pm — No Comments

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