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Don Philip Faithful's Blog Posts Tagged 'market' (12)

Market Alignment - An Application of Systems Theory for Organizations

The main components of systems theory that readers might remember are “inputs,” “processes,” and “outputs.”  The part that tends to get neglected is “feedback mechanisms.”  These mechanisms tell the system the extent to which operations fit the environment.  If there is lack of fitness, there is stress.  One adaptive impulse is to make processes more complex and intelligent - i.e. sometimes described as the fight response.  Another impulse is to give up and run away - i.e. the flight…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on June 23, 2018 at 9:00am — 1 Comment

Measuring Levels of Alignment

In my most recent blog, I discussed the idea of aligning the supply of services to market demand.  My conceptualization of “alignment” specifically relates to time intervals: i.e. having people at the right place and at the right time - for example, to take advantage of opportunities - is a sign of alignment.  Alignment for me is often about the relationship between capacity and incapacity:  the ability to supply services versus the inability to satisfy the market demand…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on June 16, 2018 at 6:30am — No Comments

Fugues of Operational Market Alignment

In the “Ecology of Metrics,” I wrote about “alignment” being a type of metric; alignment can measure the extent to which an organization’s supply or capacity is matched against the demands or needs of the market.  For instance, in a call centre, it would be highly desirable to have agents available to respond to calls at “precisely” the same time that clients are making calls.  If alignment is off even by only 15 to 30 seconds, impatient clients might hang up and never call again.  Similarly…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on June 2, 2018 at 5:00am — No Comments

Seduction of Success

The following simulation is based on a presentation that I attended in the 1990s.  I was an investment junkie back then.  I sat down, and I listening to people speak about their ideas on making money - on television and sometimes live.  The presenter in this case was trying to explain that investment success is sometimes a matter of chance.  He had people in the audience stand up.  He asked them to guess heads or tails.  Those that were correct continued to the next round - to guess again -…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on March 31, 2018 at 11:00am — 2 Comments

When Aggregates Fail

In general, any expression of performance that applies to a department can, if the data system is configured properly, be stated in relation to individual workers.  For instance, if # of sales contracts / # of customer enquiries = success rate, the success rate can be given for the entire dealership and also for each sales agent in that dealership.  Due to the differences in performance between agents, it can be problematic to only make use of the aggregate.  Some agents might be blamed for…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on February 25, 2018 at 7:30am — No Comments

Judging Health Through Metrics of Conformance

I have written in the past about the difference between market demand and operational capacity - and how difficult it is to determine what exactly is being measured in relation to either.  Has the demand for a product declined, or is the organization simply less capable of satisfying it?  For example, the fact there are no bananas in the grocery store does not mean that there is no demand for bananas; but the absence of revenues from the sale of bananas might be regarded, rather erroneously,…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on December 9, 2017 at 10:30am — No Comments

Sequenced Differential Lattices and Randomness

The images on this blog are from an algorithmic environment that I first developed about 15 years ago - rendered using a graphical system that I wrote in Java.  A “differential lattice” is a structured array of differences between two points:  e.g. the difference between the closing price of a stock on day T-0 (today) and T-6 (a week ago).  Consequently, if the closing prices are $10.10, $10.20, $10.30, $10.40, and $10.50 (today), then 0/3 is from T-0/T-3 or $10.50 less $10.20 = $0.30.  A…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on August 12, 2017 at 5:30am — No Comments

Seasonality

I have never been formally trained on how to deal with seasonality. But I wanted to take a moment to share my perspective based on experience, which I hope readers will find fairly straightforward. Some people use sales revenues in order to evaluate seasonal differences. I find it more desirable to analyze units sold if possible. A price increase resulting in slightly higher revenues does not in itself represent increased demand. Nor should discounted prices leading to reduced revenues…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on August 23, 2015 at 5:19am — No Comments

Value-Liquidity Cycle

I made a recent discovery that I would like to share with the community. In my previous blog, I introduced a special algorithmic shell that distributes stocks based on their price movements (along the x-axis) and volume movements (y-axis). Using this shell, it is possible to visualize the trading behaviours of dozens of stocks simultaneously. I noticed one day that the stocks seemed to be lining up in formation. I decided to test the accuracy of my visual interpretation. Below I present the…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on March 22, 2015 at 5:22am — No Comments

Algorithmic Sensitivity to Social Phenomena Using Fractals

I took only a single biology course during my years in university. My environmental toxicology professor explained that when testing for the LD50 (the dose that kills 50 percent of a population) a certain percentage will probably die right away; on the other hand, some might be able to tolerate unusually high exposure levels. There is a distribution of responses. A related principle applies to stress. People respond differently to stress: some might flee from their stressors (avoid or evade)…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on March 7, 2015 at 6:34am — No Comments

Social Construction of Technical Trading Data

I heard an accountant once say that people in his profession are generally bad investors. I am uncertain if this is true. I never really bothered to confirm his assertion. He said that his reasons for believing so relate to the nature in which accountants interpret data, which he implied was rather literal. I personally almost always ignore "book value" - that is to say, the cost of acquisition. For me, the book value is similar to a figure of speech: the investment value never has to be…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on February 16, 2015 at 6:57am — No Comments

Development as Art - Hopscotch and Robots

When I read a blog, I often find myself in deep thought as I approach the end, trying to determine if the author has said anything that I might be able to use. A blog doesn't have to say anything. Nor does it have to be useful to me specifically. It might simply offer a personal reflection on life. As a person who also writes blogs, I…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on January 3, 2015 at 8:16am — No Comments

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