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Don Philip Faithful's Blog Posts Tagged 'event' (12)

Object Constructs More Accurate than Language or Numbers

In my last blog, I explained my “Animal Spirit Model,” which I used to consider Paddock the Vegas shooter and the fictitious character Jack Torrance (played by Jack Nicholson) in the 1980 horror movie “The Shining.”  In this blog, I will be considering the character of Mrs. Torrance - Jack’s wife (played by Shelley Duvall).  Below I present the computer generated description for Mrs. Torrance followed by her animal spirit on Excel.  The descriptor program responds to the settings on the…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on October 13, 2017 at 5:00am — No Comments

Engaging the Animal Spirit in the Narrative

How might a person go about studying something elusive like serial murder or terrorism?  I have no formal exposure in this area.  Much of the technology that I mention in this blog is meant for another purpose.  That other purpose is to study characters in movies, which for me is a great diversion.  In particular, I like to map out where certain characters might be found (or lost - i.e. missing characters): the settings they occupy, their roles, their relationships.  It goes without saying…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on October 9, 2017 at 5:00am — No Comments

Science of the Body - Different Kind of Risk Reward Analysis

I was wondering how to approach this blog when I decided to toast some raisin-bread for breakfast.  Shortly after I started eating it, I began coughing.  I have shared this “type” of story with a few people.  I often continue eating something regardless of my exact circumstances - that is to say, oblivious to the consequences.  As I ate more of the raisin-bread and my coughing worsened, I eventually reached for my inhaler.  (I have been diagnosed with borderline asthma now by two doctors.) …

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on May 13, 2017 at 8:00am — No Comments

Spectral Attenuation Monitor

About a month ago in a blog, I introduced what I described as a “spectral attenuation monitor.”  At the time I only had an image from MS Works that…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on April 9, 2017 at 6:30am — No Comments

Crosswave Differential Event Model

I have been writing about the Crosswave Differential Algorithm for a number of years. I described in previous blogs how the algorithm emerged almost by accident while I was attempting to write an application intended to support quality control. In this blog I will be discussing the event model that powers the algorithm. Events are the details and circumstances…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on January 14, 2017 at 5:27am — No Comments

Following the Odour of Data - Catching Scent

In recent blogs, I wrote about using codified narrative as a form of data. I also discussed using attribution models to systematically evaluate codified narrative for ontological constructs: e.g. "child abuse" "physical confinement" "cannibalism." I provide a brief overview of these topics a bit later in the blog. The third important piece to make use of narrative data involves "attribution profiling" in a process that I call "catching scent." Following the odour of data involves…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on April 29, 2016 at 4:44am — 1 Comment

Role of Attribution Modelling in the Analysis of Codified Narrative

In this blog, I will be discussing the use of attribution models in relation to codified narrative. For this purpose, I will be referring to the plots of two films: the 1974 horror classic “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre”; and a 2014 dark comedy called “Tusk.” I have my own codification system called BERLIN: this is short for “Behavioural Event Reconstruction Linguistic Interface for Narratives.” An attribution model supports the inference of meaning from data. Imagine a student one day going…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on April 9, 2016 at 7:08am — No Comments

BERLIN and Narratives

BERLIN stands for Behavioural Event Reconstruction Linguistic Interface for Narratives. I introduced BERLIN a few blogs ago - in my "final blog." Theoretically after one's final blog, no further blogs are forthcoming. However, I am now posting bonus blogs reflecting aspects of the same closing subject. Today, I will be elaborating on BERLIN's syntax and how its searches are facilitated. As a general rule, the objective of BERLIN is to convert human-friendly narrative into computer-friendly…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on March 5, 2016 at 10:12am — No Comments

Mass Data Simulations

I have been using the term "mass data assignment" in my blogs. I thought I should offer the community some simulated examples. These are simple simulations: all the data is in one place in an agreeable format. The file contents are meant to be easy to peruse. When I was younger, there was a television series called "Stargate SG-1." I have a number of seasons on DVD. In this series, a special branch of the U.S. Air Force visits offworld sites using stable wormholes: teams enter the wormholes…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on November 14, 2015 at 6:41am — No Comments

Development as Art - Hopscotch and Robots

When I read a blog, I often find myself in deep thought as I approach the end, trying to determine if the author has said anything that I might be able to use. A blog doesn't have to say anything. Nor does it have to be useful to me specifically. It might simply offer a personal reflection on life. As a person who also writes blogs, I…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on January 3, 2015 at 8:16am — No Comments

Thresholds, Butterflies, and the Metrics of Phenomena

My favourite explanation of the "butterfly effect" so far is as follows: Under particular conditions, even the tiniest movements of a butterfly can trigger storms and hurricanes. This principle is not limited to butterflies, of course. I think that many of us face pivotal moments in life that leave lasting effects. Perhaps no different than other students, I remember running out of cash during my undergraduate years. I consider this my personal butterfly moment. I had no money for food. I…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on June 7, 2014 at 7:33am — No Comments

Geography of Data - Restoring the Transpositional

Above is a distribution of price differentials for the Dow Jones Industrial Average from the 1930s. The image was generated by one of my programs called Storm. I posted a few images from the same application in other blogs. If I recall correctly, the more volatile differentials (closer to the action) are at top; the more stable differentials (further from the…

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Added by Don Philip Faithful on May 24, 2014 at 6:51am — No Comments

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