.

A must have tool to analyse latest AI research papers fast

Here is a great too for your AI research

I feel like a kid in a candy shop! 

If you are like me, and want to stay on top of AI, you spend a lot of time working through research papers

However, there is no tool which can show you great new research in AI in near real time

So, it was great to find this free and open source tool from labml.ai which uses twitter to mine papers which are interesting.

I agree with this analysis because some of these papers are already on my radar.

Below is my top few papers as per the engine. 

AI is a vast subject and rapidly evolving, so this tool should help you stay on top of your research

A notable mention to one of the most memorable names I have seen for an AI paper :) - GANs N' Roses: Stable, Controllable, Diverse Image to Image Translation 

Image source flickr

Links

Title

Description

Abstract

https://papers.labml.ai/paper/2105.04026

The Modern Mathematics of Deep Learning

We describe the new field of mathematical analysis of deep learning. This field emerged around a list of research questions that were not answered within the classical framework of learning theory. We present an overview of modern approaches that yield partial answers to these questions.

We describe the new field of mathematical analysis of deep learning. This field emerged around a list of research questions that were not answered within the classical framework of learning theory. These questions concern: the outstanding generalization power of overparametrized neural networks, the role of depth in deep architectures, the apparent absence of the curse of dimensionality, the surprisingly successful optimization performance despite the non-convexity of the problem, understanding what features are learned, why deep architectures perform exceptionally well in physical problems, and which fine aspects of an architecture affect the behavior of a learning task in which way. We present an overview of modern approaches that yield partial answers to these questions. For selected approaches, we describe the main ideas in more detail.

https://papers.labml.ai/paper/2106.04554

A Survey of Transformers

Transformers have achieved great success in many artificial intelligence fields. Up to the present, a great variety of Transformer variants (a.k.a. X-formers) have been proposed. A systematic literature review on these Transformer variants is still missing.

Transformers have achieved great success in many artificial intelligence fields, such as natural language processing, computer vision, and audio processing. Therefore, it is natural to attract lots of interest from academic and industry researchers. Up to the present, a great variety of Transformer variants (a.k.a. X-formers) have been proposed, however, a systematic and comprehensive literature review on these Transformer variants is still missing. In this survey, we provide a comprehensive review of various X-formers. We first briefly introduce the vanilla Transformer and then propose a new taxonomy of X-formers. Next, we introduce the various X-formers from three perspectives: architectural modification, pre-training, and applications. Finally, we outline some potential directions for future research.

https://papers.labml.ai/paper/2106.06561

GANs N' Roses: Stable, Controllable, Diverse Image to Image Translation (works for videos too!)

A map that takes a content code, derived from a face, and a randomly chosen style code to an anime image. The map is not just diverse, but also correctly represents the probability of an anime, conditioned on an input face.

We show how to learn a map that takes a content code, derived from a face image, and a randomly chosen style code to an anime image. We derive an adversarial loss from our simple and effective definitions of style and content. This adversarial loss guarantees the map is diverse -- a very wide range of anime can be produced from a single content code. Under plausible assumptions, the map is not just diverse, but also correctly represents the probability of an anime, conditioned on an input face. In contrast, current multimodal generation procedures cannot capture the complex styles that appear in anime. Extensive quantitative experiments support the idea the map is correct. Extensive qualitative results show that the method can generate a much more diverse range of styles than SOTA comparisons. Finally, we show that our formalization of content and style allows us to perform video to video translation without ever training on videos.

https://papers.labml.ai/paper/2106.03253

Tabular Data: Deep Learning is Not All You Need

Several deep learning models for tabular data have been proposed. They claim to outperform XGBoost for some use-cases. We show that an ensemble of the deep models and X GBoost performs better on these datasets.

A key element of AutoML systems is setting the types of models that will be used for each type of task. For classification and regression problems with tabular data, the use of tree ensemble models (like XGBoost) is usually recommended. However, several deep learning models for tabular data have recently been proposed, claiming to outperform XGBoost for some use-cases. In this paper, we explore whether these deep models should be a recommended option for tabular data, by rigorously comparing the new deep models to XGBoost on a variety of datasets. In addition to systematically comparing their accuracy, we consider the tuning and computation they require. Our study shows that XGBoost outperforms these deep models across the datasets, including datasets used in the papers that proposed the deep models. We also demonstrate that XGBoost requires much less tuning. On the positive side, we show that an ensemble of the deep models and XGBoost performs better on these datasets than XGBoost alone.

https://papers.labml.ai/paper/2009.05673

Applications of Deep Neural Networks

Deep learning is a group of exciting new technologies for neural networks. It is now possible to create neural networks that can handle tabular data, images, text, and audio as both input and output. Readers will use the Python programming language to implement deep learning using Google TensorFlow and Keras

Deep learning is a group of exciting new technologies for neural networks. Through a combination of advanced training techniques and neural network architectural components, it is now possible to create neural networks that can handle tabular data, images, text, and audio as both input and output. Deep learning allows a neural network to learn hierarchies of information in a way that is like the function of the human brain. This course will introduce the student to classic neural network structures, Convolution Neural Networks (CNN), Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM), Gated Recurrent Neural Networks (GRU), General Adversarial Networks (GAN), and reinforcement learning. Application of these architectures to computer vision, time series, security, natural language processing (NLP), and data generation will be covered. High-Performance Computing (HPC) aspects will demonstrate how deep learning can be leveraged both on graphical processing units (GPUs), as well as grids. Focus is primarily upon the application of deep learning to problems, with some introduction to mathematical foundations. Readers will use the Python programming language to implement deep learning using Google TensorFlow and Keras. It is not necessary to know Python prior to this book; however, familiarity with at least one programming language is assumed.

https://papers.labml.ai/paper/2104.13478

Geometric Deep Learning: Grids, Groups, Graphs, Geodesics, and Gauges

Deep learning can be used to solve complex problems. It can be applied to complex problems such as learning to fold a ball into a square. It is also a way to study the structure of the human brain.

The last decade has witnessed an experimental revolution in data science and machine learning, epitomised by deep learning methods. Indeed, many high-dimensional learning tasks previously thought to be beyond reach -- such as computer vision, playing Go, or protein folding -- are in fact feasible with appropriate computational scale. Remarkably, the essence of deep learning is built from two simple algorithmic principles: first, the notion of representation or feature learning, whereby adapted, often hierarchical, features capture the appropriate notion of regularity for each task, and second, learning by local gradient-descent type methods, typically implemented as backpropagation. While learning generic functions in high dimensions is a cursed estimation problem, most tasks of interest are not generic, and come with essential pre-defined regularities arising from the underlying low-dimensionality and structure of the physical world. This text is concerned with exposing these regularities through unified geometric principles that can be applied throughout a wide spectrum of applications. Such a 'geometric unification' endeavour, in the spirit of Felix Klein's Erlangen Program, serves a dual purpose: on one hand, it provides a common mathematical framework to study the most successful neural network architectures, such as CNNs, RNNs, GNNs, and Transformers. On the other hand, it gives a constructive procedure to incorporate prior physical knowledge into neural architectures and provide principled way to build future architectures yet to be invented.

https://papers.labml.ai/paper/2106.08962

Efficient Deep Learning: A Survey on Making Deep Learning Models Smaller, Faster, and Better

Deep Learning has revolutionized the fields of computer vision, natural language understanding, speech recognition, information retrieval and more. We believe this is the first comprehensive survey in the efficient deep learning space that covers the landscape of model efficiency from modeling techniques to hardware support.

Deep Learning has revolutionized the fields of computer vision, natural language understanding, speech recognition, information retrieval and more. However, with the progressive improvements in deep learning models, their number of parameters, latency, resources required to train, etc. have all have increased significantly. Consequently, it has become important to pay attention to these footprint metrics of a model as well, not just its quality. We present and motivate the problem of efficiency in deep learning, followed by a thorough survey of the five core areas of model efficiency (spanning modeling techniques, infrastructure, and hardware) and the seminal work there. We also present an experiment-based guide along with code, for practitioners to optimize their model training and deployment. We believe this is the first comprehensive survey in the efficient deep learning space that covers the landscape of model efficiency from modeling techniques to hardware support. Our hope is that this survey would provide the reader with the mental model and the necessary understanding of the field to apply generic efficiency techniques to immediately get significant improvements, and also equip them with ideas for further research and experimentation to achieve additional gains.

https://papers.labml.ai/paper/2007.01547

Descending through a Crowded Valley -- Benchmarking Deep Learning Optimizers

Analyze over 50,000 runs with different optimizers. Optimizer performance varies across tasks. Adam remains strong.

Choosing the optimizer is considered to be among the most crucial design decisions in deep learning, and it is not an easy one. The growing literature now lists hundreds of optimization methods. In the absence of clear theoretical guidance and conclusive empirical evidence, the decision is often made based on anecdotes. In this work, we aim to replace these anecdotes, if not with a conclusive ranking, then at least with evidence-backed heuristics. To do so, we perform an extensive, standardized benchmark of fifteen particularly popular deep learning optimizers while giving a concise overview of the wide range of possible choices. Analyzing more than $50,000$ individual runs, we contribute the following three points: (i) Optimizer performance varies greatly across tasks. (ii) We observe that evaluating multiple optimizers with default parameters works approximately as well as tuning the hyperparameters of a single, fixed optimizer. (iii) While we cannot discern an optimization method clearly dominating across all tested tasks, we identify a significantly reduced subset of specific optimizers and parameter choices that generally lead to competitive results in our experiments: Adam remains a strong contender, with newer methods failing to significantly and consistently outperform it. Our open-sourced results are available as challenging and well-tuned baselines for more meaningful evaluations of novel optimization methods without requiring any further computational efforts.

https://papers.labml.ai/paper/2106.14843

CLIPDraw: Exploring Text-to-Drawing Synthesis through Language-Image Encoders

CLIPDraw synthesizes novel drawings based on natural language input. The algorithm does not require any training. It operates over vector strokes rather than pixel images.

This work presents CLIPDraw, an algorithm that synthesizes novel drawings based on natural language input. CLIPDraw does not require any training; rather a pre-trained CLIP language-image encoder is used as a metric for maximizing similarity between the given description and a generated drawing. Crucially, CLIPDraw operates over vector strokes rather than pixel images, a constraint that biases drawings towards simpler human-recognizable shapes. Results compare between CLIPDraw and other synthesis-through-optimization methods, as well as highlight various interesting behaviors of CLIPDraw, such as satisfying ambiguous text in multiple ways, reliably producing drawings in diverse artistic styles, and scaling from simple to complex visual representations as stroke count is increased. Code for experimenting with the method is available at: https://colab.research.google.com/github/kvfrans/clipdraw/blob/main...

https://papers.labml.ai/paper/2106.06981

Thinking Like Transformers

Transformers have no such familiar parallel. We propose a computational model for the transformer-encoder in the form of a programming language. We show how RASP can be used to program solutions to tasks that could conceivably be learned by a Transformer.

What is the computational model behind a Transformer? Where recurrent neural networks have direct parallels in finite state machines, allowing clear discussion and thought around architecture variants or trained models, Transformers have no such familiar parallel. In this paper we aim to change that, proposing a computational model for the transformer-encoder in the form of a programming language. We map the basic components of a transformer-encoder -- attention and feed-forward computation -- into simple primitives, around which we form a programming language: the Restricted Access Sequence Processing Language (RASP). We show how RASP can be used to program solutions to tasks that could conceivably be learned by a Transformer, and how a Transformer can be trained to mimic a RASP solution. In particular, we provide RASP programs for histograms, sorting, and Dyck-languages. We further use our model to relate their difficulty in terms of the number of required layers and attention heads: analyzing a RASP program implies a maximum number of heads and layers necessary to encode a task in a transformer. Finally, we see how insights gained from our abstraction might be used to explain phenomena seen in recent works.

https://papers.labml.ai/paper/2106.02584

Self-Attention Between Datapoints: Going Beyond Individual Input-Output Pairs in Deep Learning

We challenge a common assumption underlying most supervised deep learning. Our approach uses self-attention to reason about relationships between datapoints explicitly. Empirically, our models solve cross-datapoint lookup and complex reasoning tasks unsolvable by traditional deep learning models.

We challenge a common assumption underlying most supervised deep learning: that a model makes a prediction depending only on its parameters and the features of a single input. To this end, we introduce a general-purpose deep learning architecture that takes as input the entire dataset instead of processing one datapoint at a time. Our approach uses self-attention to reason about relationships between datapoints explicitly, which can be seen as realizing non-parametric models using parametric attention mechanisms. However, unlike conventional non-parametric models, we let the model learn end-to-end from the data how to make use of other datapoints for prediction. Empirically, our models solve cross-datapoint lookup and complex reasoning tasks unsolvable by traditional deep learning models. We show highly competitive results on tabular data, early results on CIFAR-10, and give insight into how the model makes use of the interactions between points.

https://papers.labml.ai/paper/2106.10207

Distributed Deep Learning in Open Collaborations

Large corporations and institutions use dedicated High-Performance Computing clusters. Grid- or volunteer computing has seen successful applications in scientific areas. Using this approach for machine learning is difficult due to high latency, asymmetric bandwidth, and other challenges.

Modern deep learning applications require increasingly more compute to train state-of-the-art models. To address this demand, large corporations and institutions use dedicated High-Performance Computing clusters, whose construction and maintenance are both environmentally costly and well beyond the budget of most organizations. As a result, some research directions become the exclusive domain of a few large industrial and even fewer academic actors. To alleviate this disparity, smaller groups may pool their computational resources and run collaborative experiments that benefit all participants. This paradigm, known as grid- or volunteer computing, has seen successful applications in numerous scientific areas. However, using this approach for machine learning is difficult due to high latency, asymmetric bandwidth, and several challenges unique to volunteer computing. In this work, we carefully analyze these constraints and propose a novel algorithmic framework designed specifically for collaborative training. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach for SwAV and ALBERT pretraining in realistic conditions and achieve performance comparable to traditional setups at a fraction of the cost. Finally, we provide a detailed report of successful collaborative language model pretraining with 40 participants.

https://papers.labml.ai/paper/2106.12627

Provably efficient machine learning for quantum many-body problems

Classical machine learning (ML) provides a potentially powerful approach to solving challenging quantum many-body problems. We prove that classical ML algorithms can efficiently predict ground state properties of gapped Hamiltonians in finite spatial dimensions.

Classical machine learning (ML) provides a potentially powerful approach to solving challenging quantum many-body problems in physics and chemistry. However, the advantages of ML over more traditional methods have not been firmly established. In this work, we prove that classical ML algorithms can efficiently predict ground state properties of gapped Hamiltonians in finite spatial dimensions, after learning from data obtained by measuring other Hamiltonians in the same quantum phase of matter. In contrast, under widely accepted complexity theory assumptions, classical algorithms that do not learn from data cannot achieve the same guarantee. We also prove that classical ML algorithms can efficiently classify a wide range of quantum phases of matter. Our arguments are based on the concept of a classical shadow, a succinct classical description of a many-body quantum state that can be constructed in feasible quantum experiments and be used to predict many properties of the state. Extensive numerical experiments corroborate our theoretical results in a variety of scenarios, including Rydberg atom systems, 2D random Heisenberg models, symmetry-protected topological phases, and topologically ordered phases.

https://papers.labml.ai/paper/2106.10745

Calliar: An Online Handwritten Dataset for Arabic Calligraphy

Calligraphy is an essential part of the Arabic heritage and culture. It has been used in the past for the decoration of houses and mosques. In the past few years, there has been a considerable effort to digitize such type of art.

Calligraphy is an essential part of the Arabic heritage and culture. It has been used in the past for the decoration of houses and mosques. Usually, such calligraphy is designed manually by experts with aesthetic insights. In the past few years, there has been a considerable effort to digitize such type of art by either taking a photo of decorated buildings or drawing them using digital devices. The latter is considered an online form where the drawing is tracked by recording the apparatus movement, an electronic pen for instance, on a screen. In the literature, there are many offline datasets collected with a diversity of Arabic styles for calligraphy. However, there is no available online dataset for Arabic calligraphy. In this paper, we illustrate our approach for the collection and annotation of an online dataset for Arabic calligraphy called Calliar that consists of 2,500 sentences. Calliar is annotated for stroke, character, word and sentence level prediction.

https://papers.labml.ai/paper/2106.11189

Regularization is all you Need: Simple Neural Nets can Excel on Tabular Data

Tabular datasets are the last "unconquered castle" for deep learning. Traditional ML methods like Gradient-Boosted Decision Trees still perform strongly against specialized neural architectures. We propose regularizing plain MLPs by searching for the optimalcombination of 13 regularization techniques for each dataset.

Tabular datasets are the last "unconquered castle" for deep learning, with traditional ML methods like Gradient-Boosted Decision Trees still performing strongly even against recent specialized neural architectures. In this paper, we hypothesize that the key to boosting the performance of neural networks lies in rethinking the joint and simultaneous application of a large set of modern regularization techniques. As a result, we propose regularizing plain Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) networks by searching for the optimal combination/cocktail of 13 regularization techniques for each dataset using a joint optimization over the decision on which regularizers to apply and their subsidiary hyperparameters. We empirically assess the impact of these regularization cocktails for MLPs on a large-scale empirical study comprising 40 tabular datasets and demonstrate that (i) well-regularized plain MLPs significantly outperform recent state-of-the-art specialized neural network architectures, and (ii) they even outperform strong traditional ML methods, such as XGBoost.

https://papers.labml.ai/paper/2106.11959

Revisiting Deep Learning Models for Tabular Data

The choice between GBDT and DL models highly depends on data and there is still no universally superior solution. We demonstrate that a simple ResNet-like architecture is a surprisingly effective baseline, which outperforms most of the sophisticated models.

The necessity of deep learning for tabular data is still an unanswered question addressed by a large number of research efforts. The recent literature on tabular DL proposes several deep architectures reported to be superior to traditional "shallow" models like Gradient Boosted Decision Trees. However, since existing works often use different benchmarks and tuning protocols, it is unclear if the proposed models universally outperform GBDT. Moreover, the models are often not compared to each other, therefore, it is challenging to identify the best deep model for practitioners. In this work, we start from a thorough review of the main families of DL models recently developed for tabular data. We carefully tune and evaluate them on a wide range of datasets and reveal two significant findings. First, we show that the choice between GBDT and DL models highly depends on data and there is still no universally superior solution. Second, we demonstrate that a simple ResNet-like architecture is a surprisingly effective baseline, which outperforms most of the sophisticated models from the DL literature. Finally, we design a simple adaptation of the Transformer architecture for tabular data that becomes a new strong DL baseline and reduces the gap between GBDT and DL models on datasets where GBDT dominates.

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Comment by ajit jaokar on July 7, 2021 at 12:10am

thanks Mino

Comment by Mirio De Rosa on July 6, 2021 at 10:03pm

Great tip. Thanks!

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