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Data Visualization of Employee metrics at the top Tech companies

The top tech companies by market capitalization are IBM, HP , Oracle , Microsoft , Cisco , SAP , EMC , Apple , Amazon and Google

All of the top tech companies are selected based on their current market capitalization with the exception of Yahoo. The year 2014 is not included as part of this analysis.

 

Data: The source of this data is from the public financial records from SEC.gov

 

All the sales figures are normalized and reported in USD billions unless noted otherwise.

 

To begin with let us see the current total employee count at each of the top tech companies

Employee count at top tech companies

[click on the image to see enlarged] 

Treemap visualization

 

As evident, IBM and HP dominate the treemap area

 

In short, the employee strength equation as of 2013

IBM + HP + Oracle > Microsoft + Cisco + SAP + EMC + Apple + Amazon + Google + Yahoo

 

Putting this in perspective

[click on the image to see enlarged]

 

Let us see how the employee growth has been across the tech companies

 [click on the image to see enlarged]

Employee growth visualization

 

Some key observations

  • Apple had no layoffs since 2000
  • Google had no layoffs until 2013 (effect of Motorolla acquisition)
  • Oracle had no layoffs since 2004 (since it started acquisition spree with Peoplesoft)
  • EMC and Amazon had no layoffs since 2002

 

What is interesting to observe is the big spikes in Amazon's employee strength growth!

 

Now let us see the performance metrics related to employees

The sales-per-employee ratio provides a broad indication of how expensive a company is to run.

[click on the image to see enlarged]

 

Companies with higher sales-per-employee ratio are usually considered more efficient than those with lower figures. A higher sales-per-employee ratio indicates that the company can operate on low overhead costs, and therefore do more with less employees, which often translates into healthy profits.

 

Looks like the big spikes in Amazon's employee strength is not justified by the down trend of sales-per-employee ratio.

 

Does it mean that it has become more expensive for Amazon to keep hiring at this pace?

 

Finally, let us see the last performance metric related to employees

Income Per Employee: Operating Income / Number of Employees

Income per employee measures company's ability to use their employee resources effectively to create profits for the company.  

[click on the image to see enlarged]

 

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Tags: analytics, big, d3js, dashboards, data, hadoop, infocaptor, obiee, qlikview, reports, More…sisense, spotfire, tableau, visualization

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Comment by Nilesh Jethwa on December 23, 2014 at 2:46pm

I use InfoCaptor instead of Tableau. [https://my.infocaptor.com/free_data_visualization.php]

Please feel free to do whatever you need with the data. We compiled the data by scavenging through SEC.gov

Comment by Marc-Paul Lee on December 23, 2014 at 1:48pm

Thanks!  I'm messing around with it now and it is fascinating.  Do you use Tableau?  If so I can share my workbook.  Or, with your permission, I can make it public.  

Comment by Nilesh Jethwa on December 23, 2014 at 9:54am
Comment by Marc-Paul Lee on December 23, 2014 at 5:35am

I think that looks better, or at least has more potential.  I wonder if you'd be willing to share your data so that I could take a stab at it visualizing it, too?  

Comment by Nilesh Jethwa on December 22, 2014 at 8:10am

Good idea Marc,

I took your suggestion and here is the scatter plot

Static version : https://my.infocaptor.com/dash/i.php?viz=mwemwymj

Live interactive : https://my.infocaptor.com/dash/mt.php?pa=employee_analysis_54984fab...

Comment by Marc-Paul Lee on December 22, 2014 at 7:47am

I'm not a fan of bar charts although I see their utility for simple presentations.  In this case you're comparing employee growth in one chart with sales per employee on another chart.  When comparing two different metrics the x-y or scatter chart could be a better tool to show outliers, as you conjecture Amazon to be.  Different colors or symbols could be used to differentiate companies.  If a company is connected by a line it could show more graphically the change over time, e.g., that Amazon's ratio has plummeted.  

Comment by Nilesh Jethwa on December 19, 2014 at 7:32am

Steve,

  Couldn't agree more. So many times you pick a fancier visualization but nothing communicates better than a simple bar chart. Treemaps are good replacements for pie charts on certain occasions

Comment by Steve Devine on December 18, 2014 at 10:27pm

Interesting article, and one that shows that 9 times out of 10 a good old bar chart goes a long way to telling the best story. Also interesting that you use a tree map as your first Viz, but then the same data as a bar chart so it can be 'put into perspective'!

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