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Hello everybody,

I'm glad to be a member of datasciencecentral!

At the end of my bachelor in business, and with a two year degree level in Mathematics and computer science, I want to do a career in Data Science. 

I'm particularly interested in two MSc in which there are science and business courses. 

Now, I must define a career path, but it's hard because I don't know what kind of jobs I will be able to apply to with a 50% business/ 50% science education.

I think that some particular jobs require a PhD, or a very high level in science, right? 

What would be the career path, for example, to become a Data Manager? 

Thank you so much for your time

BR

Nol

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PhD might not help you these days, some employers view it negatively. There are plenty of jobs in which you can leverage your business degree: BI (business intelligence, e.g. business analyst) or get hired by a consulting firm, to name a few. Other options: becoming an analyst for a company like Gartner, work in the finance industry, or become a marketing analyst.

What is sure is that I will go through a master of science (which will include Machine learning, deep learning, and all the science stuff required to work in data science). So, my question is: What are the different job for someone that has business skills and science skills, but who has not a high level in science? 

Nol, 

I've been an executive recruiter for over 30 years now.  And while I have limited experience in the placement of Data Science professionals, I do have extensive experience in placing professionals who have lots of experience in the areas of database marketing analytics and just about anything having to do with data-driven marketing.  Clearly, your educational pursuits and interests are extremely relevant to today's marketplace, but if I were to offer any advice about what specific  degree specialty you should pursue given your choices, I would say choose the one that is of the strongest interest to you or that you're most passionate about.  If you follow that path, you'll stand a much greater chance at being good if not excellent at it and will reap the appropriate professional and financial awards.  Look inside and rely on your best judgement on this.  

Thanks for your answers and for your time!! 

I really have more interests studying sciences, and that's why I chose this path. However, there are so much students stronger than me in sciences that if I want to succeed in my career, I have to also rely on my business skills. 

For the moment, the two only positions that I know which include Business and scienceare Business Analyst and Data manager. I would like to know more positions if I want to build a solid career path. 

Vincent – Another eye-opener for me – so Thanks! -  “PhD might not help you these days, some employers view it negatively.”



Vincent Granville said:

PhD might not help you these days, some employers view it negatively. There are plenty of jobs in which you can leverage your business degree: BI (business intelligence, e.g. business analyst) or get hired by a consulting firm, to name a few. Other options: becoming an analyst for a company like Gartner, work in the finance industry, or become a marketing analyst.

Lee - Your usage of the phrase 'Database Marketing Analytics' and 'Database Marketing and Analytics' on your LinkedIn immediately bring HUGE RELIEF to me – In my mind, somehow it clicks together a few fields I’m building my skills in [Digital Marketing, Marketing Analytics, Interacting with large Databases, Coding etc. Developing Digital Assets etc.]

Thank You! because I never came across these phrases – not atleast in the learning domain - I’ve looked up more than 100 courses -on MOOCs, Forums, DM Gurus.  All these use one or more of the above phrases very discretely and somehow one struggles to find their place on the entire spectrum.



Lee Knight Candiotti said:

Nol, 

I've been an executive recruiter for over 30 years now.  And while I have limited experience in the placement of Data Science professionals, I do have extensive experience in placing professionals who have lots of experience in the areas of database marketing analytics and just about anything having to do with data-driven marketing.  Clearly, your educational pursuits and interests are extremely relevant to today's marketplace, but if I were to offer any advice about what specific  degree specialty you should pursue given your choices, I would say choose the one that is of the strongest interest to you or that you're most passionate about.  If you follow that path, you'll stand a much greater chance at being good if not excellent at it and will reap the appropriate professional and financial awards.  Look inside and rely on your best judgement on this.  

I feel this confusion as well, especially since job titles are essentially made up by people at individual companies, and don't necessarily focus on specific skills. This is why countries have classifications of careers that don't necessarily line up with job titles very easily. So frustrating.

Anubhav said:

Lee - Your usage of the phrase 'Database Marketing Analytics' and 'Database Marketing and Analytics' on your LinkedIn immediately bring HUGE RELIEF to me – In my mind, somehow it clicks together a few fields I’m building my skills in [Digital Marketing, Marketing Analytics, Interacting with large Databases, Coding etc. Developing Digital Assets etc.]

Thank You! because I never came across these phrases – not atleast in the learning domain - I’ve looked up more than 100 courses -on MOOCs, Forums, DM Gurus.  All these use one or more of the above phrases very discretely and somehow one struggles to find their place on the entire spectrum.

I do agree. And that makes the question "what is your career plan" very difficult to answer when we apply to a MSc of data science... 

What should be a good career path for a business analyst, for example? Long term goal, short term goal? 

Rick Henderson said:

I feel this confusion as well, especially since job titles are essentially made up by people at individual companies, and don't necessarily focus on specific skills. This is why countries have classifications of careers that don't necessarily line up with job titles very easily. So frustrating.

I work for a specialty chemical and textile company which regularly transplants people that have various backgrounds and educational levels from research and development into product sales and/or product management roles on the business side.  It's incredibly beneficial for those people to have a technical background.

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