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Most of us are not arrogant, especially the more experienced, business-oriented and senior practitioners. And evidently, I completely disagree with the two motto displayed below. But a few analytic professionals exhibit tunnel vision - and I would not want to hire such individuals. Their respective arrogance is well summarized in these two t-shirts:

The statistician arrogance: (translation: I know better than you, you know nothing)

The data scientist arrogance: (translation: data is perfect, no need for statistical modeling or anything else)

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It always happens. Sometimes arrogance is intentional to pursue a point. The software development industry had a similar situation a decade and a half ago with the rise of agile. There as well a strawman (waterfall development) was regularly put up and knocked down. If you didn't wholeheartedly subscribed to the agile manifesto then you were classed as a waterfall adherent and hence hopelessly behind the times. - It was great marketing hype and sold many companies to introduce agile (and when they failed it was always the fault of the company because they weren't 'pure' enough).

Maybe we are seeing similar attempts here. 

As is true with most things, surely the reality Ior possibly truth) is somewhere in the middle. Living at either extreme is hazardous and I would say foolish. Who really wants to live at the North or South poles? They might be interesting places to visit, but they are hard places to live. (speaking all metaphorically, of course)

Curiously enough, it seems to me that statistics is data science by definition; certainly it has been about making valid inferences from available data since Pascal first started formulating his theories on probability (it's just that early statisticians didn't have all of the cool toys available to modern ones; or nearly as much data).  Personally, I don't claim to be either one, though I have been involved in data analysis in one way or another since 1993 (I'm not a real statistician; I'm a programmer).

In any event, it isn't arrogance to recognize that one has something valuable to offer others (either for pay or gratis).  Here in the good old USA, we tend to undervalue intellectual pursuits in the name of populism (that has been true since at least the 18th Century), but if we've learned anything in the last two decades it is that data analytics can help to improve all sorts of decision making processes.  It is valuable; relevant, and thus nothing to be ashamed of.

Just remember that in this world, nobody is infallible; ergo, you might be wrong, which is why humility is a virtue.

John, Excellent synopsis!
 

John L. Ries said:

Curiously enough, it seems to me that statistics is data science by definition; certainly it has been about making valid inferences from available data since Pascal first started formulating his theories on probability (it's just that early statisticians didn't have all of the cool toys available to modern ones; or nearly as much data).  Personally, I don't claim to be either one, though I have been involved in data analysis in one way or another since 1993 (I'm not a real statistician; I'm a programmer).

In any event, it isn't arrogance to recognize that one has something valuable to offer others (either for pay or gratis).  Here in the good old USA, we tend to undervalue intellectual pursuits in the name of populism (that has been true since at least the 18th Century), but if we've learned anything in the last two decades it is that data analytics can help to improve all sorts of decision making processes.  It is valuable; relevant, and thus nothing to be ashamed of.

Just remember that in this world, nobody is infallible; ergo, you might be wrong, which is why humility is a virtue.

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