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17 areas to benefit from big data analytics in next 10 years

Here's my list:

  1. Automated piloting (cars talking to cars) will reduce accidents and optimize your commute. 
  2. Better fraud detection will catch IRS fraudsters and terrorists before they strike. 
  3. Better encryption and monitoring systems will allow the creation of new, private currencies, avoiding the speculation that surrounds Bitcoin. 
  4. Early detection of epidemics thanks to crowdsourcing 
  5. Detection of earthquakes, solar flares - including intensity forecasting. 
  6. Customized, on-demand, online education with automated grading.
  7. Customized drugs based on patient's history
  8. Optimizing electricity trading and delivery (smart grids)
  9. Better search technology (on Google, Amazon, online product catalogues, search engines), and customized searches with increased relevancy
  10. Better user profiling, more targeted marketing
  11. Better detection of fake reviews for systems based on collaborative filtering (in short, superior collaborative filtering technology)
  12. Better detection of authorship / original posters (via attribution modeling)  to make journalism and publishing better; detection of duplicates and plagiarism on the web; news feeds quality scoring; early detection of high quality, popular news and tweets posted by unknown authors (to help journalists)
  13. Better taxonomies to classify text (news, user reports, published articles, blog posts, yellow pages etc.)
  14. More customized (optimized) pricing and automated bidding on a number of exchanges
  15. Detection of duplicate and fake accounts on social networks
  16. Geo-marketing via cell phone (restaurants, retail)
  17. Steganography

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